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Brownies support whales and dolphins

01 August 2017

WDC Visits Schools In Wales

PamThis is a guest blog by WDC long-term volunteer, Pam Styles. Pam has been helping us run our education pilot project in South Wales.  She has visited a number of schools already and has been impressed by the enthusiasm the children have shown for learning about whales and dolphins and environmental issues.

In my role as a WDC educator, I’ve visited hundreds of schoolchildren aged six to eleven years old, aiming to inspire them to protect whales and dolphins and the wider marine environment.

Our environmental education sessions are always fun and interactive. And children ask so many brilliant questions! “Why do companies use non-recyclable packaging?”; “How are whales transported to marine parks?” and; “Is it legal to keep whales and dolphins in captivity?”

Children showed a whole range of emotions from awe at the size of a blue whale or the depths to which a Cuvier’s beaked whale can dive, to the thrill of pretending to be a dolphin echolocating to find fish, and sadness about the problems whales and dolphins are facing, such as captivity, pollution and accidental death in fishing nets.

When challenged to come up with their own ideas to solve some of these real-world problems, children amazed me with their creativity and logic, especially when it came to designing nets that would be effective for catching fish, but that would not catch whales and dolphins. They were given no further direction or ideas from me but came up with a whole range of possible solutions. They considered the material the net was made from, and their ideas included a solid cage that dolphins couldn’t get tangled in, or netting material dolphins would be strong enough to break but fish wouldn’t. Others suggested employing technology such as sensors able to detect whales and dolphins by their size, weight or appearance; alarm buzzers that make unpleasant sounds to warn dolphins off and: a time delay on the fishing net closure to give dolphins time to escape.

Children finding out about dolphin life in the playground.

Our new WDC learning sessions are helping to ensure that when these children inherit the problems and challenges facing whales and dolphins that we are trying to tackle today, they will approach them with determination, creativity, and a questioning mind. They will be able to use their skills of enquiry and problem solving to never stop striving for solutions, always asking, “Why are things done that way?”, and “Isn’t there a better way?”

WDC would like to thank the Oakdale Trust and Ernest Cook Trust for supporting this important environmental education and outreach work in schools in England and Wales.

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